The Socioeconomics of a Post-Apocalypse: Interview with the Imaginaries Podcast

In which I chat with Tony Colella and Kend Mullison on The Imaginaries Podcast Episode 78: Suyi Davies Okungbowa on the Socioeconomics of the Postapocalypse.

Show Notes

What are the socioeconomics of the postapocalypse? Suyi Okungbowa has a book coming out this summer that defies Western genre expectations of godpocalypse and urban fantasy and dystopic postapocalypse narratives … and instead moves into——and helps to create——a new space within science fiction and fantasy. His book is titled David Mogo, Godhunter, and yes, the word Afrofuturism provides one way to look at what it’s up to; but Okungbowa draws upon contemporary realities and the landscape of present-day Lagos to interrogate privilege, social norms, and our economic assumptions of disaster. David Mogo, Godhunter is conversant with works like Emily St. John Mandel’s Station Eleven, N.K. Jemisin’s The Fifth Season, Neil Gaiman’s American Gods, Rebecca Roanhorse’s Trail of Lightning, and yes, The Dresden Files too.

This week, Okungbowa joins us on the podcast to talk about all of these things as well as the nature and effects of migration, community building in the aftermath of devastation, and why science fiction and fantasy are so congenial to dealing with these issues.

In the podcast, Okungbowa mentions several works worth further exploration:
– Clayton Alderfer’s ERG theory of motivation
– Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah’s “Friday Black”
– Jess Row’s “Your Face in Mine”

You can find out more about Suyi Davies Okungbowa at www.suyidavies.com or follow him on Twitter under the handle @IAmSuyiDavies. David Mogo, Godhunter is due out in July 2019.

Like our content or our new introduction? Our website is www.imaginaries.net, and you can drop us a line at imaginarypod@gmail.com or find us on Twitter at @imaginary_pod. You can find ALL of our back episodes on YouTube, and listen to our episodes on iTunes or SoundCloud. If you would like to help support our work, you can do so at www.ko-fi.com/imaginaries.

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